surf with me
Anatomy of a Story Sketch:  Here’s a little breakdown of my thinking and simplification of a character I often draw.  The thing about storyboarding is that you have tons, and tons of drawing to do.  For a 22 minute show, our team of two board artists is averaging 2000 story panels in 3 weeks.  That’s a lot of drawings!  So, it’s essential to have a shorthand of the characters.  This is how I have broken down Bobgoblin from “Wallykazam” thus far.  It has all the essential information I”m trying to get across and nothing more.  We all draw them differently btw.  Personally, I try to get as close to “on-model” as I can for various reasons.  Considering our show is CG, you’d think that drawing on-model isn’t that important.  Fortunately, it isn’t as critical as in a 2D show.  But, I have noticed that the more specific you can be, the more likely you’ll get back what you intended.  A CG show is a little like live action in that the characters actually occupy space.  If you don’t draw the characters proportionately, then you’re going to have staging problems at some point in the pipeline.  And, the people posing out the CG characters will be forced to take liberties and re-interpret your work. You also have to be aware of the limitations of a CG “rig”.  Drawing on model helps contain problems down the line.   So, I just say,  try to be close to on-model as a goal.  Another line of thinking is that we are story tellers, and that’s most important.  The animators (over-sees) should concern themselves with the acting-not the story artists.  That’s pretty valid too, I think.  It’s a bit much to ask of a board artist to always draw on model considering all the drawings we have to do.  The downside to that is you’re leaving a lot of room for interpretation of your work.  And, if it goes awry, you’ll be pretty bummed, and it won’t reflect well on you in the long run.  On the other hand, if you’re specific, then you’re more likely to see the work come back even better than you expected.  Think about it:  if you’re an artist oversees and are inspired by what you see, won’t you go the extra mile to plus it?  I think that’s why some shows don’t look that good:  nobody’s going the extra mile that it takes.
I think I’ve spelled out all the things that matter to me in the attached drawing.  Most vital are the facial features because that’s where the audience will be looking.  All other details in a shot will support the idea of what your character is thinking or doing.  I tend to think of Bobgoblin as clueless.  That take on his character affects how I pose him.  All the lines try to hint that he’s clueless.  He could be in an excited, more upright pose, but I’ll still try to lead all those lines to a face that appears clueless.  The things that matter on his face happen to be the general oblong shape, the tilt of his head, spacing of the eyes to nose, and gesture of the ears, which could reflect his attitude or help describe his head orientation, as can that very minor tuft of hair on the top of his head.  So, there you have it:  all this mumbo jumbo to describe a seemingly simple story sketch.  That’s what they pay us for.
-Waveybrain

Anatomy of a Story Sketch:  Here’s a little breakdown of my thinking and simplification of a character I often draw.  The thing about storyboarding is that you have tons, and tons of drawing to do.  For a 22 minute show, our team of two board artists is averaging 2000 story panels in 3 weeks.  That’s a lot of drawings!  So, it’s essential to have a shorthand of the characters.  This is how I have broken down Bobgoblin from “Wallykazam” thus far.  It has all the essential information I”m trying to get across and nothing more.  We all draw them differently btw.  Personally, I try to get as close to “on-model” as I can for various reasons.  Considering our show is CG, you’d think that drawing on-model isn’t that important.  Fortunately, it isn’t as critical as in a 2D show.  But, I have noticed that the more specific you can be, the more likely you’ll get back what you intended.  A CG show is a little like live action in that the characters actually occupy space.  If you don’t draw the characters proportionately, then you’re going to have staging problems at some point in the pipeline.  And, the people posing out the CG characters will be forced to take liberties and re-interpret your work. You also have to be aware of the limitations of a CG “rig”.  Drawing on model helps contain problems down the line.   So, I just say,  try to be close to on-model as a goal.  Another line of thinking is that we are story tellers, and that’s most important.  The animators (over-sees) should concern themselves with the acting-not the story artists.  That’s pretty valid too, I think.  It’s a bit much to ask of a board artist to always draw on model considering all the drawings we have to do.  The downside to that is you’re leaving a lot of room for interpretation of your work.  And, if it goes awry, you’ll be pretty bummed, and it won’t reflect well on you in the long run.  On the other hand, if you’re specific, then you’re more likely to see the work come back even better than you expected.  Think about it:  if you’re an artist oversees and are inspired by what you see, won’t you go the extra mile to plus it?  I think that’s why some shows don’t look that good:  nobody’s going the extra mile that it takes.

I think I’ve spelled out all the things that matter to me in the attached drawing.  Most vital are the facial features because that’s where the audience will be looking.  All other details in a shot will support the idea of what your character is thinking or doing.  I tend to think of Bobgoblin as clueless.  That take on his character affects how I pose him.  All the lines try to hint that he’s clueless.  He could be in an excited, more upright pose, but I’ll still try to lead all those lines to a face that appears clueless.  The things that matter on his face happen to be the general oblong shape, the tilt of his head, spacing of the eyes to nose, and gesture of the ears, which could reflect his attitude or help describe his head orientation, as can that very minor tuft of hair on the top of his head.  So, there you have it:  all this mumbo jumbo to describe a seemingly simple story sketch.  That’s what they pay us for.

-Waveybrain

izmia:

Creative Doodles : Playfully replace fellow commuters’ heads with cartoon characters. - Yaratıcı Karalamalar: Ev ile iş arası yolculuk yapan kişilerin kafalarını çizgi film karakterleri ile değiştirme. by October Jones

disneyineveryway:

Gah I love them

It’s a trip to see a movie you worked on appear in your Tumblr feed.  Most people in the biz I talk to consider Atlantis a flop.  It’s nice to see that there are people who liked it.  It was my first feature, so I don’t know if I really enjoyed working on it because of that, or because I liked the movie. Either way, it was fun to draw Milo.-Waveybrain

disneyineveryway:

Gah I love them

It’s a trip to see a movie you worked on appear in your Tumblr feed. Most people in the biz I talk to consider Atlantis a flop. It’s nice to see that there are people who liked it. It was my first feature, so I don’t know if I really enjoyed working on it because of that, or because I liked the movie. Either way, it was fun to draw Milo.
-Waveybrain

Here’s another page of studies:  feet, folds, anatomy, tones…that’s what I was focusing on tonight. -Waveybrain                                         

Here’s another page of studies:  feet, folds, anatomy, tones…that’s what I was focusing on tonight. -Waveybrain                                         

I’ve been pretty annoyed with myself lately for dialing in certain things in my designs.  So, here are some much needed studies on women’s shoes and anatomy.  It’s been a while since I’ve done real figure drawing, so here is an attempt at re-grounding my anatomy.  These are “virtual tracings”-so don’t be impressed.  I’m just sharing stuff that’ve been troubling me lately in my personal work.  It’s fun to take the time and just examine things.  -Waveybrain                                                                    

I’ve been pretty annoyed with myself lately for dialing in certain things in my designs.  So, here are some much needed studies on women’s shoes and anatomy.  It’s been a while since I’ve done real figure drawing, so here is an attempt at re-grounding my anatomy.  These are “virtual tracings”-so don’t be impressed.  I’m just sharing stuff that’ve been troubling me lately in my personal work.  It’s fun to take the time and just examine things.  -Waveybrain                                                                    

"Lucky Luca and His Royal Pony" a 2am doodle -Waveybrain

"Lucky Luca and His Royal Pony" a 2am doodle -Waveybrain

We saw Miyazaki’s latest film, Arrietty aka, “The Borrowers” this past weekend.  Amazing!  The way the scale and sound was depicted; the incredible detail; all the subtle acting nuances and keen observations typical of Miyazaki;  the lush backgrounds and beautifully rendered textures…there is so much to enjoy.  Non-animation people might not appreciate how difficult it is to depict such scale in a hand-drawn medium, but Miyazaki does it masterfully.  Some of the characters are pretty ugly looking, but I like that.  It’s more true to life.  And, he manages to make them compelling and fun despite that.  I found myself thinking about the study and observations that goes into his movies in comparison to the details and study that goes in to an american animated features like: Tangled , Kung Fu Panda, Dragons…each are lush and full of observation. But, Miyazaki’s sensibilities stand apart for some reason.  I think his films are like an Eyvind Earle painting:  incredibly rich and full of detail across the entire canvas, making Miyazaki’s movies feel more dreamlike with a heightened sense of reality.  Whereas, most american films are lit in ways that stage the action theatrically and downplay the background elements.  In a Miyazaki movie the background is as much a character as the “actors”. The only thing I was a little disappointed by was that I thought the movie was going to be more about conservation.  That is what I was hearing in the media/see: asinine “news” clip:  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuFcWkFJZgk).  The movie was more about symbiosis than conservation.  I was hoping my kids would understand conservation better after the movie.  But, instead they probably understand borrowing.

-Waveybrain

Very nice proverb and drawing!  -Waveybrain
the-absolute-best-posts:

A Chinese proverb says an invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, despite the time, the place, despite the circumstances. The thread can be tightened or tangled, but never be broken.

Very nice proverb and drawing!  -Waveybrain

the-absolute-best-posts:

A Chinese proverb says an invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, despite the time, the place, despite the circumstances. The thread can be tightened or tangled, but never be broken.

Here are caricatures I dabbled with.  The one with the flag was to mess with my good pal.  The guy riffling at his computer is my co-worker.  Whenever I passed by his office that’s the impression I got of him.  I usually draw politicians when I’m annoyed with them to vent.  These are doodles just for fun.  -Waveybrain

My cell phone is waning, but I managed to extract the pics from it tonight. Most of these drawings I’m going to post are a little old now, and I’ve already shared them in FB.  This model is actually a man I used to work with at Disney:  he worked in the effects department.  His name is John Tucker and he’s a great model because he understands the kinds of expressions and storytelling poses that animation artists crave.  Some of these drawings are opposite angles of drawings that Steven Silver included in one of his drawing books…”Drawn to Life”, I think.  I remember when I saw his book I thought it was kind of neat to that we have our different takes from that day of figure drawing.  I really enjoy drawing.  Usually my aim is to capture what I’m seeing and try to get in the mind of the model.  Hopefully, that comes through in my drawings.  -Waveybrain